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How to Eat Your BOX! (Week of 1/14/2018)

 Cara Cara Navel Oranges:

Their pinkish orange flesh is reminiscent of grapefruit, but their taste is sweeter and softly tropical. It is believed that Cara Cara’s are a result of a Washington navel crossed with the Brazillian Bahia. Subtle tastes of cherry, rose petal and cranberry is enough to brighten a dreary day and make a salad of avocado and feta quite special. Try it!

Health benefits: Oranges are rich in antioxidants―vital for healthy cells―including vitamin C, which aids in healing, boosts your immune system, helps your body absorb iron, and even helps reduce the risk of cancer. This citrus fruit is also a good source of fiber, which helps lower cholesterol and, like vitamin C, reduce your cancer risk. (To maximize your fiber intake, be sure to eat some of the spongy white pith right under the skin.)

Lettuce/Greens:

The key to keeping greens fresh is to pre-wash, dry and store them. Try to wash your greens the same day that your box of good is delivered. Try to make sure when you’re unpacking your box to set the lettuce and any other greens on the kitchen counter, so you don’t forget to wash them.

First off, fill a large bowl with some cold water and swirl the leaves around to get rid of the excess dirt. When washing kale, de-stem it as you’re washing it. That will save you time when it comes to throwing that kale salad together. Place in salad spinner, give the spinner a whirl, and spin until your greens are dry.

Wrap greens up in a paper towel or clean cotton kitchen cloth. Make sure to wrap the leaves up gently but tightly, a lot like you would a sleeping bag.

Place the wrapped lettuce inside sealed plastic bags and store in your crisper drawer. The lettuce should stay good for about a week to two weeks, though you should always eat ‘em sooner!

Now that you have some freshly washed greens, you can make some amazing salads on the fly. Here’s to eating more greens!

Arugula:

This peppery green is ubiquitous with fresh salads (try it with blue cheese, walnuts and Asian or Bosc pears), but it is also great atop pizzas (add just after you remove them from the oven, and allow to wilt slightly), or to wilt atop a winter soup. Store in the refrigerator and use within 3-4 days to prevent from becoming bitter.

 

 

Featured Recipe:  Power Salad

Total time: under 15 minutes. Serves 2.

Ingredients:

 

1 teaspoon olive oil

1-2 tablespoons lemon juice

pinch of salt

Generous handful of fresh butter lettuce leaves, cleaned and gently torn

Generous handful of fresh arugula

1 small handful of thinly sliced chard

1/4 cup diced red pepper

1/2 cup toasted pumpkin seeds or pepitas

1 Cara Cara orange, sliced into segments

2 tablespoons crumbled feta cheese

4 ounces of sliced grilled chicken

 

Instructions:

  1. Combine In a medium bowl first whisk the olive oil, lemon juice, and salt together. Add the lettuce, arugula, and chard and toss them in the dressing. Top with the red pepper, pumpkin seeds, orange segments, grilled chicken, and feta. Optional, top with a dollop of Hope original hummus.

 

adapted from recipe by girlgonegourmet.com

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Kale Raab Salad with Chickpeas and Ricotta

CRISPY KALE RAAB, CHICKPEA, AND RICOTTA SALAD

Ingredients                                                                                                                         Serves 4

1 bag of kale raab, rinsed and trimmed

1 15 ounce can of chickpeas, drained or equivalent amount of cooked chickpeas (available in our grocery section)

2 cloves garlic, sliced

3 tablespoons of good quality olive oil, plus more for drizzling

sea salt

1 cup of fresh ricotta or soft goat cheese

red pepper flakes

2 tablespoons of fresh lemon juice

handful of fresh mint, finely chopped (optional)

 

Instructions

  1. Preheat your broiler. Combine the raab kale mix, chickpeas, and garlic with oil in a large bowl. Season with salt and toss to coat.
  2. Transfer to a foil-lined baking sheet and broil for about two minutes, taking care to flip the broccolini once. Broil for another two minutes.
  3. Divide among plates and top with fresh ricotta. Season with red pepper flakes (to taste) and more sea salt.
  4. Drizzle with a bit of lemon juice and olive oil. Sprinkle with fresh chopped mint. Serve with toast.

BRAISING KALE RAAB

Many people do not know that kale raab is fit to eat, let alone delicious, but it’s actually sweeter and more delicate than actual kale leaves. The small, yellow flower bud clusters that pop up when kale crops are about to go to seed are known as kale raab, or kale rabe. This little-used treat makes for an impressive ingredient, but is surprisingly easy to prepare. Quick cooking will highlight the fragrant, clean taste of your kale raab.

Store: Store just like you would kale, unwashed in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Prep: If the stems are tender (test by snapping one off with your fingers) you can use the whole bunch. You may wish to remove the outer stems and just use the sweet inner stems and leaves.

Use: Kale Raab can be used in substitution for kale in many recipes. It it fantastic lightly steamed, sautéed, as well as blanched!

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Tangerine Roasted Beets & Greens with White Beans and Feta

Tangerine Roasted Beets & Greens with White Beans and Feta

Adapted from thefirstmess.com

 

INGREDIENTS:

Beets:

3-4 beets, peeled (greens removed, and separated for later)

splash of sherry balsamic vinegar

juice from 1/2 tangerine

olive oil

salt & pepper, to taste

Beans, etc.:

2 cups white beans

olive oil

the beet greens

juice from 1/2 tangerine

salt+pepper

Topping:

crumbled Feta cheese

INSTRUCTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Cut the beets into 1 inch wedges and place them in a glass baking dish. Add the splash of sherry vinegar, tangerine juice, a nice slick of olive oil, salt, and pepper. Toss to coat the beets evenly. Cover the dish with foil and roast for 30 minutes or until the beets give when pierced with a small knife. Uncover the beets, toss them around and roast them for 5-10 more minutes, just to evaporate some of the juices.

 

Heat some oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the beet greens and stir. Season with salt and pepper. Squeeze in the grapefruit juice. Keep tossing them until all of the greens are lightly wilted. Remove from the pan and chop them up. Toss the chopped greens with the white beans, some extra olive oil, salt, and pepper. Lay the beans + greens on the base of your serving plate. Arrange the roasted beet wedges on top and finish the plate by topping generously with the crumbled feta cheese. Serve warm or at room temperature. Enjoy!

Serves 4-6.

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How To Keep Your Greens Fresh

The key to keeping greens fresh is to pre-wash, dry and store them. Try to wash your greens the same day that yourbox of good is delivered. Try to make sure when you’re unpacking your box to set the lettuce and any other greens on the kitchen counter, so you don’t forget to wash them.

First off, fill a large bowl with some cold water and swirl the leaves around to get rid of the excess dirt. When washing kale, de-stem it as you’re washing it. That will save you time when it comes to throwing that kale salad together. Place in salad spinner, give the spinner a whirl, and spin until your greens are dry.

Spread two paper towels (still connected) on your counter and pile the dry lettuce/kale/spinach/other leaves on one end. Wrap the paper towel around your greens and then add some more leaves and continue the process until all the greens are wrapped up.  Make sure to wrap the leaves up gently but tightly, a lot like you would a sleeping bag.

Place the wrapped lettuce inside sealed plastic bags and store in your crisper drawer. The lettuce should stay good for about a week to two weeks.  Honestly, you should never keep those greens around for more than a week anyway.

Now that you have some freshly washed greens, you can make some amazing salads on the fly. Here’s to eating more greens!

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Know Your Produce: Collard Greens

Collard greens are part of the cruciferous vegetable family, which also includes kale, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, rutabaga and turnips. These nutrition powerhouses pack in lots of nutrients for a little amount of calories. If you are trying to eat healthier, cruciferous vegetables like collard greens should be at the very top of your grocery list. Collard greens are a great source of Vitamins A and K, as well as folate, manganese, and calcium.

Store: Loosely wrap greens in slightly damp paper towels, then place in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 4 days. Wash just before using.

Prep: Hold each leaf by the stem. With the other hand, zip the leafy part off the stem. Discard the stems. (Chard stems may be cooked.) Cut the leaves into strips. Swirl the greens in a salad spinner filled with water. Lift out the basket; discard the water. Repeat until no dirt remains.

Use: Sauté tip: Heat oil in a large skillet. Add as many greens to the skillet as will fit, season with salt and pepper, and cook, tossing frequently. As the greens wilt, add more greens to the skillet. Cook until tender.

Note: dark leafy greens pair very will with savory items such as garlic, onions, and bacon (traditionally, they were paired with ham hocks or pig jowels), and balance out well when served with a dollop of coconut oil or a cultured whole milk dairy, such as sour cream or crème fraîche (or even butter) – saturated fat helps the body assimilate the fat-soluble vitamins, calcium, and minerals contained in the greens.

 

For more extensive information on Collard Greens, check out this article on Mercola.com

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Collard Raab & Garlic Recipe

Collard raab? What on earth is that? Known also as rabe, this spring delicacy can also come from cabbage, kale, and broccoli. Raab is the result of over-wintered plants in the brassica family flowering and sending out their seed shoots. The result is a tender green superfoodx100.

Raab is most tender before its florets burst into a yellow or white flowers, and are a fantastic spring treat in stir-frys, raw in salads, added to soups, or on the grill. It can also be boiled, steamed, braised, or sauteed, and it pairs well with pastas, hot peppers, or spicy sausages.

This recipe is simple. Reminiscent of Italian sauteed greens, with a distinctive bite. The recipe takes just 15 minutes to prepare and serves 4 to 6 people as a side.

Ingredients:

1 bunch collard raab

1/2 cup water

2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed

2 teaspoons tamari soy sauce

Directions:

1. Wash the collard raab, chop, and set aside.

2. Combine the water, garlic, and soy sauce in a pan. Bring to a boil, and then ease the in the collard raab.

3. Cover and cook for 3-5 minutes, until crisp-tender.